An unsafe world- or so it seems!

I get occasional advisories from the US government about travel safety issues in India.  Apparently there is increased unrest in various parts of India right now- here’s the latest bulletin.  Interestingly, there is even some areas of danger in relatively safe South India from “Naxalites”, armed groups of Marxists.  India is a huge country with many internal borders where there is conflict and external and disputed areas borders with Pakistan and China.  Sometimes the travel tips seem overly cautious, but then it makes sense that the government wants to minimize risk to Americans.  I’m glad that Tamilnadu tends to be quite peaceful and safe most of the time.  I certainly have no plans to travel in disputed areas or regions of current conflict.

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India, Level 2: Exercise increased caution 
Exercise increased caution in India due to crime and terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.
Do not travel to:
The state of Jammu and Kashmir (except the eastern Ladakh region and its capital, Leh) due to terrorism and civil unrest.

wiithin 10 km of the India-Pakistan border due to the potential for armed conflict.

Indian authorities report rape is one of the fastest growing crimes in India. Violent crime, such as sexual assault, has occurred at tourist sites and in other locations.

Terrorist or armed groups are active in East Central India, primarily in rural areas. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

If you decide to travel to India:

  • Do not travel alone, particularly if you are a woman. Visit our website for Women Travelers.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebookand Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for India.
  • S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Incidents of violence by ethnic insurgent groups, including bombings of buses, trains, rail lines, and markets, occur occasionally in the northeast. U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to the states of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Tripura, and Manipur without special authorization from the U.S. Consulate General in Kolkata.

Maoist extremist groups, or “Naxalites,” are active in a large swath of India from eastern Maharashtra and northern Telangana through western West Bengal, particularly in rural parts of Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand and on the borders of Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, and Odisha. The Naxalites have conducted frequent terrorist attacks on local police, paramilitary forces, and government officials.

Thinking about traveling to other parts of the world?  Here’s the State Department’s color coded list of current threat levels in many countries.

 

 

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Vera de Jong says:

    Hi Cynthia

    I just read this out to Rosemary, who’s going to be going to Amritsar and up to the border for the changing of the guards. After reading it all out I said, ‘So, basically there’s nothing going on and you have nothing to worry about.’ (:

    Hope you’re fine!

    Love

    V

    On Sun, Jan 21, 2018 at 11:51 AM, Cynthia Dettman wrote:

    > Cynthia Dettman posted: “I get occasional advisories from the US > government about travel safety issues in India. Apparently there is > increased unrest in various parts of India right now- here’s the latest > bulletin. Interestingly, there is even some areas of danger in relatively” >

    Like

    1. Well shoot, I hope I didn’t scare her out of her wits! I’m just glad I’m not stationed in any of these borderland places. I feel nice and safe here in Chennai! Cynthia

      Like

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